Part 1: More New Zealand Metal Spheres Under Project Moon Dust

U. S. Department of Defense, Joint Chiefs of Staff Message Center,  from Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) concerning Project Moon Dust information from New Zealand location received on November 13, 1978.
U. S. Department of Defense, Joint Chiefs of Staff Message Center, from Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) concerning Project Moon Dust information from New Zealand location received on November 13, 1978.

Timeline of Metal Spheres Discovered South of Ashburton, New Zealand:

1)  4 similar-sized titanium alloy balls 15 inches in diameter landed on John Lindores farm about 10 miles south of Ashburton on April 3, 1972. Soviets denied metal balls were remnants of Venus-bound spacecraft later renamed Cosmos 482. But New Zealand authorities said Cyrillic Russian writing was found, even though never photographed.

2)  2 other smaller titanium alloy balls, a larger piece of spacecraft and a cylindrical structure were also found by other residents April 3, 1972, a little further south of Ashburton.

Back row:  Group of four similar-sized titanium alloy spheres found on April 3, 1972, by farmer John Lindores about 10 miles south of Ashburton. Front row: Two smaller spheres, larger spacecraft piece and cylindrical structure found further south of John Lindores farm. Photograph © Ashburton Aviation Museum.
Back row:  Group of four similar-sized titanium alloy spheres found on April 3, 1972, by farmer John Lindores about 10 miles south of Ashburton. Front row: Two smaller spheres, larger spacecraft piece and cylindrical structure found further south of John Lindores farm. Photograph © Ashburton Aviation Museum.
Russian Space Web.com illustration of  “the Venera-D spacecraft approaching clouds-veiled Venus. Shown configuration was only one of several designs envisioned at the conclusion of the project's definition phase in September 2009. A ball-shaped capsule containing the main lander can be seen at the top, with four mini-capsules carrying atmospheric balloons attached just below it. Individual entry capsules for each balloon would allow to deploy scientific sensors over much wider regions of the planet then it would be possible if they were all released from a single descent vehicle.”
Russian Space Web.com illustration of  “the Venera-D spacecraft approaching clouds-veiled Venus. Shown configuration was only one of several designs envisioned at the conclusion of the project's definition phase in September 2009. A ball-shaped capsule containing the main lander can be seen at the top, with four mini-capsules carrying atmospheric balloons attached just below it. Individual entry capsules for each balloon would allow to deploy scientific sensors over much wider regions of the planet then it would be possible if they were all released from a single descent vehicle.”

3)  Silicon-aluminum alloy sphere found October 24, 1978, by farmer John Lovett also south of Ashburton.

4)  Silicon-aluminum alloy sphere found November 5, 1978, by New Zealand DSIE (Defense Security Information Exchange) also south of Ashburton.

The triangle pattern of metallic spheres discovered between April 3, 1972,  and October 24 and November 5, 1978, were in a region about ten miles south of Ashburton, South Island, New Zealand.
The triangle pattern of metallic spheres discovered between April 3, 1972, and October 24 and November 5, 1978, were in a region about ten miles south of Ashburton, South Island, New Zealand.

November 18, 2009  Albuquerque, New Mexico - On March 31, 1972, the Soviet Union launched a Venus 9 spacecraft later renamed Cosmos 482 with the goal of making a Venus trajectory for exploration. But four days later on April 3, 1972, the Venus 9 failed as it tried to move into the planned Venus trajectory. At 1 AM on April 3, 1972, a farmer named John Lindores of Ashburton, New Zealand, reported that four red-hot, metallic balls about 38 centimeters in diameter (15 inches) landed on his farm near Ashburton. Two smaller spheres, a larger spacecraft piece and cylindrical structure were found further south of John Lindores farm by other residents.

 

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