Part 1 – Is Dark Matter the “Heavy Shadow” of Visible Matter?

Graphic depicting visible matter worlds above the blue rectangle and bigger, heavier "shadow," or partner, particles below the blue rectangle that are not seen in the visible matter worlds. Supersymmetry theory in physics postulates that every particle we observe has a massive "shadow-partner" particle. No supersymmetric particle has yet been seen. Image courtesy CERN, Switzerland.
Graphic depicting visible matter worlds above the blue rectangle and bigger, heavier "shadow," or partner, particles below the blue rectangle that are not seen in the visible matter worlds. Supersymmetry theory in physics postulates that every particle we observe has a massive "shadow-partner" particle. No supersymmetric particle has yet been seen. Image courtesy CERN, Switzerland.

January 13, 2004  Ann Arbor, Michigan - In February 2001, the Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, Long Island, New York, announced that physicists there had made a new measurement of what is called, "the muon anomalous magnetic moment." The number looks like this:

 

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