Now Bumblebees Are Disappearing, Too. 

"Without bumblebees, I would be out of business. I don't think I could hand-pollinate all these plants."

- Tony Davis, Quail Run Farm, Grants Pass, Oregon

UC-Davis Professor Emeritus Robbin Thorp, Ph.D., holds a Franklin's bumblebee queen in his office at the university's Bee Biology Department on Thursday, August 16, 2007. Prof. Thorp is afraid the Franklin's Bumblebee is now extinct and no one knows why. Image © 2007 by Steve Yeater/AP.
UC-Davis Professor Emeritus Robbin Thorp, Ph.D., holds a Franklin's bumblebee queen in his office at the university's Bee Biology Department on Thursday, August 16, 2007. Prof. Thorp is afraid the Franklin's Bumblebee is now extinct and no one knows why. Image © 2007 by Steve Yeater/AP.

October 13, 2007  Davis, California - Another scientific mystery is expanding: the disappearance of pollinators in North America. First, it was the massive disappearance of at least 25% of all the honey bees in the United States and Canada this past year in what is called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Now it is the severe decline of four bumblebee species that used to be prevalent on the West and East coasts of the U. S. and Canada – but now scientists can’t find them. In fact, one species known as Bombus franklini – or Franklin’s Bumblebee – might be extinct. And it’s all happened since 1994.

 

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