Amphibians Dying Out At Alarming Rate

“This recent and massive decline in amphibian populations,
that have been on Earth for millions of years, is one of the greatest extinction events in history.”

- Andrew Blaustein, Ph.D., Oregon State University

AmphibianArk.org
AmphibianArk.org

Amphibian Ark's Disturbing Statistics:

50%  of  some 6,000 described amphibian species, are threatened with extinction.

165 amphibian species believed to have already gone extinct, including 34 known to be extinct and 130 not found in recent years and possibly extinct.

500  amphibian species whose threats currently cannot be mitigated quickly enough to stave off extinction.

Harlequin Frog - 67% of Central and South America's 110 harlequin frog species are believed to have vanished during the 1980s and 1990s. A new study says the primary culprit is the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which has been spurred by global warming. Photograph by Forrest Brem, NatureServ.
Harlequin Frog - 67% of Central and South America's 110 harlequin frog species are believed to have vanished during the 1980s and 1990s. A new study says the primary culprit is the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which has been spurred by global warming. Photograph by Forrest Brem, NatureServ.

January 18, 2008  Corvallis, Oregon -  Can you imagine what the Earth would be like without frogs, toads and salamanders? Mosquitoes, flies and other insect populations eaten by amphibians would soar. Until now, the possibility that frogs, toads and salamanders that have been living on this planet for millions of years could ever disappear was unthinkable. 2008 has been declared the Year of the Frog by Amphibian Ark.org, which is trying to let the world know that amphibians are dying out in ever-increasing numbers. Scientists say that without immediate public, zoo and government efforts to conserve them, this century could see the extinction of nearly half of all the world's 6,000 amphibian species.

 

Click here to subscribe and get instant access to read this report.

Click here to check your existing subscription status.

Existing members, login below:


© 1998 - 2018 by Linda Moulton Howe.
All Rights Reserved.