Updated:  25% of Novel H1N1 Americans Sick Enough for Hospitalization End Up in Intensive Care

“Contrary to the perception among many people that this influenza, the novel H1N1, is mild, (new) data vividly demonstrate that this influenza can make you very, very ill.”

- William Schaffner, M. D.,
Vanderbilt University Flu Exper

 

New England Journal of Medicine on October 8, 2009, reports CDC research that indicates 7% mortality in U. S. H1N1 cases - above normal seasonal flu. H1N1 cases doubling each week and virulent strain of H3N2 coming north from Southern Hemisphere. Novel 2009 H1N1 photomicrograph by CDC.
New England Journal of Medicine on October 8, 2009, reports CDC research that indicates 7% mortality in U. S. H1N1 cases - above normal seasonal flu. H1N1 cases doubling each week and virulent strain of H3N2 coming north from Southern Hemisphere. Novel 2009 H1N1 photomicrograph by CDC.

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See:  October 8, 2009 Online Issue.

- Critical Care Services and 2009 H1N1
Influenza in Australia and New Zealand.

- Hospitalized Patients with 2009 H1N1
Influenza in the United States, April–June 2009

October 9, 2009  Houston, Texas - The October 8, 2009, New England Journal of Medicine featured two recent studies about the intensity of the new 2009 H1N1 flu virus, both in the United States and the Southern Hemisphere’s Australia and New Zealand.

Perhaps the most surprising news in the research by the American Centers for Disease Control is that this past spring, 7% of Americans sick enough to be hospitalized with the H1N1 flu, have died. That 7% is a higher mortality rate than ordinary seasonal flu.

 

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