Lionfish Invaders Are Eating Up Other Marine Life in Florida Keys, Bahamas and Bermuda

“The lionfish is a voracious predator and it eats a lot! ... over 50 species of other reef fish have been found in lionfish stomachs (plus) a whole octopus.”

- Lad Atkin, REEF

 

If attacked, the carnivorous lionfish delivers a potent venom via its needle-like dorsal fins. Its sting is extremely painful to humans and can cause nausea and breathing difficulties, but is rarely fatal. Average lifetime in wild: 15 years. A lionfish will often spread its feathery pectoral fins and herd small fish into a confined space where it can more easily swallow them. Photograph by NOAA.
If attacked, the carnivorous lionfish delivers a potent venom via its needle-like dorsal fins. Its sting is extremely painful to humans and can cause nausea and breathing difficulties, but is rarely fatal. Average lifetime in wild: 15 years. A lionfish will often spread its feathery pectoral fins and herd small fish into a confined space where it can more easily swallow them. Photograph by NOAA.
Lionfish sightings as of February 1, 2010. Map by USGS, REEF and NOAA.
Lionfish head on. Image © 2006 by Ada Staal.
Lionfish head on. Image © 2006 by Ada Staal.
Lionfish head on. Image © 2006 by Ada Staal.

February 25, 2010  Key Largo, Florida -  The lionfish is any of several species of beautiful, venomous marine fish of the family Scorpaenidae native to the Indo-Pacific oceans. Lionfish extend from western Australia and Malaysia east to French Polynesia, the Pitcairn Islands, southern Japan and southern Korea.

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