BP’s Gulf Crude Oil Nearly 40% Methane – Will Huge Dead Zone Follow?

“This is the most vigorous eruption of methane from the sea floor that's been witnessed in the modern history of humans.”

- John Kessler, Ph.D., Chemical Oceanographer, Texas A & M

This image from video on Thursday, July 1, 2010, shows crude oil erupting from BP's (British Petroleum) Macondo broken wellhead that contains nearly 40% methane dissolving in the Gulf of Mexico. Video image by BP PLC.
This image from video on Thursday, July 1, 2010, shows crude oil erupting from BP's (British Petroleum) Macondo broken wellhead that contains nearly 40% methane dissolving in the Gulf of Mexico. Video image by BP PLC.
The BP (British Petroleum) Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded on April 20, 2010. The huge fire on the Deepwater Horizon semi-submersible Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU) was about 40 miles (64 km) southeast of the Louisiana coast in the Macondo Prospect oil field. The explosion killed 11 workers and injured 17 others; another 98 people survived without serious physical injury. It caused the Deepwater Horizon to burn and sink, and started a massive ongoing offshore oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico; this is now considered the largest environmental disaster in U.S. history. Image by U. S. Coast Guard.
The BP (British Petroleum) Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded on April 20, 2010. The huge fire on the Deepwater Horizon semi-submersible Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU) was about 40 miles (64 km) southeast of the Louisiana coast in the Macondo Prospect oil field. The explosion killed 11 workers and injured 17 others; another 98 people survived without serious physical injury. It caused the Deepwater Horizon to burn and sink, and started a massive ongoing offshore oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico; this is now considered the largest environmental disaster in U.S. history. Image by U. S. Coast Guard.

July 6, 2010  College Station, Texas - After the BP (British Petroleum) Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded on April 20, 2010, and its Macondo wellhead broke a mile down on the Gulf of Mexico sea floor, that uncontrolled eruption of crude oil, under the extreme pressure of being a mile under the ocean water, has turned into the worst environmental disaster in United States history. Some scientists wonder if the BP oil catastrophe could be creating yet a second disaster where the oil-contaminated Gulf will end up with a huge dead zone without oxygen where marine life cannot live?

 

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