Secret Radar Stations in New Mexico, Part 1

A triangle of sensitive geographic areas and three secret experimental microwave radar stations. Construction begun in late 1947 of El Vado (AFS-P8), Moriarty (AFS-P7), and Continental Divide (AFS-P51). The three radar stations were part of the U. S. Aircraft Control and Warning (AC&W) system that also became known as LASHUP. One of El Vado's specific missions was to protect the Los Alamos Laboratory and the Atomic Energy Commission's atomic bomb production at Los Alamos and Sandia Base.
A triangle of sensitive geographic areas and three secret experimental microwave radar stations. Construction begun in late 1947 of El Vado (AFS-P8), Moriarty (AFS-P7), and Continental Divide (AFS-P51). The three radar stations were part of the U. S. Aircraft Control and Warning (AC&W) system that also became known as LASHUP. One of El Vado's specific missions was to protect the Los Alamos Laboratory and the Atomic Energy Commission's atomic bomb production at Los Alamos and Sandia Base.

April 11, 2011 Albuquerque, New Mexico - Editor's Note:  Odd that the FBI chose April 2011 to release the March 22, 1950, document now on their website without proper context and that U. K. editors, who apparently don't know the history, are issuing headlines claiming the memo proves the Roswell crashes. That March 22, 1950, document from Guy Hottel, Special Agent In Charge (SAC), Washington, D. C., to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover was first released after a mid-1970s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request from Navy physicist Bruce Maccabee to the FBI. The memo references “circular in shape” and “a very high-powered radar set-up in that area.”

 

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