Updated Japan’s 3/11 Radiation Refugees

“We in Otsu-City, Shiga Prefecture, 311 miles (500 km)
from Fukushima, are seeing readings around 0.15 microsieverts on average, which is around five times what the Japanese government is reporting. My wife and children will leave Japan as early as possible because I perceive a growing exodus will come and it might become hard to place kids in schools.””

-  Frank Daulton, Ph.D., Applied Linguistics, Ryukoku Univ., Kyoto, Japan

Testing citizens for radioactivity in Japan. Image © 2011 by Reuters.
Testing citizens for radioactivity in Japan. Image © 2011 by Reuters.
Fukushima Prefecture (top red circle) is where TEPCO nuclear power plants exploded and melted down after the March 11, 2011, 9.1 magnitude earthquake and tsunami. Fukushima, is 500 kilometers (311 miles) from Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures (lower red circle), where ground radiation in September 2011 is five times higher than what the Japanese government says, according to university professor.
Fukushima Prefecture (top red circle) is where TEPCO nuclear power plants exploded and melted down after the March 11, 2011, 9.1 magnitude earthquake and tsunami. Fukushima, is 500 kilometers (311 miles) from Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures (lower red circle), where ground radiation in September 2011 is five times higher than what the Japanese government says, according to university professor.

Update October 2, 2011- First physical traces of plutonium found 28 miles (45 km) from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in soil that underscores Prof. Daulton's deep concerns in this Earthfiles report - along with the general Japanese public's fears - about the radioactive dangers that persist in the air, water, marine seafood, soil and crops since Japan's 3/11.

 

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