“God Particle” Search Narrows to 124 – 126 GeV.

“We have doubts. We are not yet sure. What we can tell you today is that we are sure that if the Higgs Boson is there, it will not escape
detection. It will definitely be discovered without any doubt in a year from now.”

- Guido Tonelli, Ph.D., Spokesperson, CERN CMS

 

A typical event illustrated above in CERN's Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) search for the cosmic Standard Model Higgs Boson "God particle" in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data from 2010-2011. Two high-energy photons collide releasing energy depicted by dashed yellow lines and thicker red lines as measured in the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter. The yellow lines are the measured tracks of other particles produced in the collision. Graphic source: CERN.
A typical event illustrated above in CERN's Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) search for the cosmic Standard Model Higgs Boson "God particle" in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data from 2010-2011. Two high-energy photons collide releasing energy depicted by dashed yellow lines and thicker red lines as measured in the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter. The yellow lines are the measured tracks of other particles produced in the collision. Graphic source: CERN.

December  13, 2011 Geneva, Switzerland - The Large Hadron Collider at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics known as CERN collides hadrons together to see what the matter part of the universe is made of down to the smallest subatomic particles. Hadrons are subatomic particles made of quarks held together by the strong force, while atoms and molecules are held together by the electromagnetic force. The best known hadrons are protons and neutrons that make up the nucleus in each atom. Theoretically in the physics “Standard Model”  of how the universe is constructed, protons have mass because of a theoretical subatomic particle called a Higgs Boson.

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