2012 NDAA Detention Statute “Unnecessary and Dangerous” 

“I have signed this bill despite having serious reservations with certain
provisions that regulate the detention, interrogation, and prosecution of suspected terrorists.  ... I want to clarify that my Administration will not authorize the indefinite military detention without trial of American citizens. Indeed, I believe that doing so would break with our most important traditions and values as a Nation. My Administration will interpret section 1021 in a manner that ensures that any detention it authorizes complies with the Constitution, the laws of war, and all other applicable law.”

- Pres. Barack Obama Signing Statement for H. R. 1540 -
National Defense Authorization Act, Dec. 31, 2011

 

U. S. President Barack Obama signed H. R. 1540 - NDAA into law on New Year's Eve, December 31, 2011, while on vacation in Hawaii. Image © 2011 by Pete Souza/White House, Getty Images
U. S. President Barack Obama signed H. R. 1540 - NDAA into law on New Year's Eve, December 31, 2011, while on vacation in Hawaii. Image © 2011 by Pete Souza/White House, Getty Images

 

H. R. 1540

Subtitle D—Counterterrorism
Subtitle D—Counterterrorism

Sec. 1021. Affirmation of authority of the Armed Forces of the United States to detain covered persons pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force.

Sec. 1022. Military custody for foreign al-Qaeda terrorists.


January 27, 2012  Washington, D. C.  - The 2012 Fiscal Year National Defense Authorization Act, known also as the NDAA, was signed into United States law on New Year's Eve December 31, 2011, by President Barack Obama during his holiday vacation in Hawaii.

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