Expedition to Baltic Sea Mystery

“In mid-May 2012, we are preparing an expedition with more sophisticated sonars, cameras and other equipment to hopefully determine what these strange objects are and if it is safe to try a dive to them.”

- Peter Lindberg, Co-Owner, Ocean Explorer, Stockholm, Sweden

 Lower left:  197-foot-diameter unidentified structure is 275 feet down on the floor of the Baltic Sea some 60 nautical miles from nearest land between Sweden and Finland. Discovered on June 19, 2011, on the last day of a treasure hunting expedition to find sunken wrecks, a second smaller anomaly (upper right arrow) was also found 600 feet away. Side scan sonar image © 2011 by Ocean Explorer X-Team, Sweden.
Lower left:  197-foot-diameter unidentified structure is 275 feet down on the floor of the Baltic Sea some 60 nautical miles from nearest land between Sweden and Finland. Discovered on June 19, 2011, on the last day of a treasure hunting expedition to find sunken wrecks, a second smaller anomaly (upper right arrow) was also found 600 feet away. Side scan sonar image © 2011 by Ocean Explorer X-Team, Sweden.
The red circle marks Stockholm, Sweden, facing the Baltic Sea, one of the largest brackish seas in the world. The water is a mixture of fresh and salt waters, but only about 35% as salty as the ocean. The Baltic waters are so murky that divers cannot see more than a few feet. The basin between Sweden and Finland was formed by glacial erosion. The Baltic Sea is about 1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles) long and averages 193 kilometers (120 miles) wide, with depths ranging from 55 meters (180 feet) to the maximum depth of 459 meters (1,506 feet).
The red circle marks Stockholm, Sweden, facing the Baltic Sea, one of the largest brackish seas in the world. The water is a mixture of fresh and salt waters, but only about 35% as salty as the ocean. The Baltic waters are so murky that divers cannot see more than a few feet. The basin between Sweden and Finland was formed by glacial erosion. The Baltic Sea is about 1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles) long and averages 193 kilometers (120 miles) wide, with depths ranging from 55 meters (180 feet) to the maximum depth of 459 meters (1,506 feet).

 

March 30, 2012  Stockholm, Sweden - The Baltic Sea is a good preservative. The salt content is low and there are no wood-burrowing organisms. Andreas Olsson, Head of Archaeology at the Swedish Maritime Museum, estimates there could be 20,000 ship wrecks on the Baltic Sea floor. “It's like a ship wreck laboratory - the best in the world” where the cold, dark water has preserved sunken objects for centuries.

 

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