Part 1, Fukushima: U.S. Class Action Lawsuit Against TEPCO

Amended class action lawsuit filed in San Diego Federal Court on February 6, 2014, on behalf of the 5,500 sailors and marines who arrived near the Fukushima shore on March 13, 2011, aboard the USS Reagan as first responders to Japan's 3/11/11 disaster amid the wind-blown radiation from TEPCO nuclear power Units 1, 2 and 3 meltdowns.
Amended class action lawsuit filed in San Diego Federal Court on February 6, 2014, on behalf of the 5,500 sailors and marines who arrived near the Fukushima shore on March 13, 2011, aboard the USS Reagan as first responders to Japan's 3/11/11 disaster amid the wind-blown radiation from TEPCO nuclear power Units 1, 2 and 3 meltdowns.

“We thought based on what we had heard about the TEPCO reactors
that we would not detect that level of radiation at 25 miles. So the radiation was much greater than what we had thought. We did not think we would detect anything at 100 miles, and yet, at 100 miles it was 30 times more than normal.”

- U. S. Navy Troy Mueller, Patrol Director, Naval Reactors

Sailors aboard the USS Ronald Reagan scrubbed the external surfaces of the flight deck and island superstructure to remove potential radiation contamination on March 23, 2011, while at sea off the coast of Japan, where the aircraft carrier was providing humanitarian assistance as directed in support of Operation Tomodachi, which means “Friend” in Japanese. Image by Nicholas Groesch, U. S. Navy.
Sailors aboard the USS Ronald Reagan scrubbed the external surfaces of the flight deck and island superstructure to remove potential radiation contamination on March 23, 2011, while at sea off the coast of Japan, where the aircraft carrier was providing humanitarian assistance as directed in support of Operation Tomodachi, which means “Friend” in Japanese. Image by Nicholas Groesch, U. S. Navy.

March 27, 2014 San Diego, California - Three years ago on Friday, March 11, 2011, at 2:46 PM local time in northeastern Japan, a massive 9.0 earthquake unleashed a 30 to nearly 50-foot-high tsunami that hit only twenty minutes later and swept 6 miles inland over Japanese towns and farm land. More than 18,000 people died or were missing and at least 160,000 people were forced to evacuate.

 

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