Part 2: Death from Below and Above in Earth Mass Extinctions

“There’s also a correlation between the times of comet impacts and large scale volcanism on the Earth. ...They are tens of thousands of times larger than the stuff that’s been coming out of Kilauea in the past 20 or 30 years.”

- Michael Rampino, Ph.D., NYU Geologist

The “double whammy” of global volcanic agitation of Earth 66 million years ago  at the same time that a 6-mile wide outer space chunk of rock or ice slammed  into the Gulf of Mexico caused K-T boundary mass extinctions on Earth.  Illustration © by Sergey Krasovskiy/Corbis.
The “double whammy” of global volcanic agitation of Earth 66 million years ago at the same time that a 6-mile wide outer space chunk of rock or ice slammed into the Gulf of Mexico caused K-T boundary mass extinctions on Earth. Illustration © by Sergey Krasovskiy/Corbis.

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November 23, 2015 New York City, N.Y. - There was a “double whammy” of global volcanic agitation of Earth 66 million years ago at the same time that a 6-mile-wide outer space chunk of rock or ice slammed into the Gulf of Mexico creating the 12-mile-deep and 112-mile-wide Chicxulub crater that wiped out the dinosaurs.

Even more ancient back to 511 million years ago during the Early-Middle Cambrian, there was the first dramatic reduction in complex multicelluar life on Earth considered to be the first mass extinction. At that time, there were huge volcanic eruptions from the Kalkarindji volcanoes in Northern and Western Australia that covered 2 million square kilometers/ 772,204 square miles with deep lava.

 

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