Part 1: Lots of 2017 Surprises On Jupiter

“We knew, going in, that Jupiter would throw us some curves. ...There is so much going on here that we didn’t expect that we have had to take a step back and begin to rethink of this as a whole new Jupiter.”

- Scott Bolton, Ph.D., Juno Principal Investigator,
Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX

NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of Jupiter and blue aurora at the massive gas planet's poles. Jupiter is composed primarily of gaseous and liquid matter and is the largest planet in our solar system with a diameter of 88,846 miles (142,984 km) at its equator, which is eleven times the size of Earth's equatorial diameter of 7,917.5 miles (12,756 km). Credit: 2016 NASA, ESA, J. Nichols, Univ. of Leicester.
NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of Jupiter and blue aurora at the massive gas planet's poles. Jupiter is composed primarily of gaseous and liquid matter and is the largest planet in our solar system with a diameter of 88,846 miles (142,984 km) at its equator, which is eleven times the size of Earth's equatorial diameter of 7,917.5 miles (12,756 km). Credit: 2016 NASA, ESA, J. Nichols, Univ. of Leicester.

 

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