Deepest, Clearest Infrared Image of Our Universe Ever Produced — Webb’s First Infrared Deep Field Released July 11-12 — How Can Billions of Planets In All These Galaxies Not Have Intelligent Life?

 

“If you held a grain of sand on the tip of your finger at arm’s length, that is the part of the universe that you’re seeing (in Webb image)  — just one little speck of the universe.”

— NASA Administrator Bill Nelson, at White House celebration of the James Webb Space Telescope’s first IR deep field, clear infrared images, July 11, 2022

NASA reports that this Webb's First Deep Field image of the galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 is the highest resolution image of the infrared universe anyone has ever seen, according to NASA. NASA Administrator Bill Nelson told President Joe Biden at the White House on Monday, July 11, 2022, that light travels at 186,000 miles per second, meaning that the light observed in a single “speck” within the image has been traveling for 13+ billion years. The goal is to get back to the beginning of this universe approximately 13.6 billion years ago. Webb will also reveal chemical composition of atmospheres around planets beyond our solar system. Targets of those studies include Procyon A and B 11.46 light-years from Earth and the TRAPPIST-1 solar system 39.46 light-years from Earth that has seven planets. Image released July 11, 2022, from the James Webb Space Telescope.
NASA reports that this Webb’s First IR Deep Field image of the galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 4.6 billion light years from Earth is the highest resolution image of the infrared universe anyone has ever seen, according to NASA. NASA Administrator Bill Nelson told President Joe Biden at the White House on Monday, July 11, 2022, that light travels at 186,000 miles per second, meaning that the light observed in a single “speck” within the image has been traveling for a few billion years. The goal is to get back to the beginning of this universe approximately 13.8 billion years ago. Webb will also reveal chemical composition of atmospheres around planets beyond our solar system. Targets of those studies include Procyon A and B 11.46 light-years from Earth and the TRAPPIST-1 solar system 39.46 light-years from Earth that has seven planets. Image released July 11, 2022, from the James Webb Space Telescope.

 


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