Levitation Possible by Reversing Casimir Force

“In principle, you could use this repelling Casimir force to levitate heavier objects, but not with current technology. With current technology, one could only conceive of levitating very light objects.”

- Thomas Philbin, Ph.D., Theoretical Physicist

August 10, 2007  Fife, Scotland - Theoretical physicists work in their mind and on paper with math and formulas trying to understand the laws of the universe. Some of the greatest of those minds have been Max Planck and Albert Einstein. More than a hundred years ago in 1900, Planck was struggling to understand radiation from black bodies. Actual experiments forced him to suppose that the electromagnetic energy of the light at a given frequency could only take discrete values: it is "quantized." Planck found that if he chose the spacing between the allowed energies correctly, his equations agreed with the experiments. This spacing is determined by a number, now called Planck's constant. For that theoretical physics work - now regarded as the birth of quantum physics - Max Planck received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918. For that theoretical physics work – now regarded as the birth of quantum physics - Max Planck received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918.

 

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