UFOs and 14th Century Black Death

“People were reporting ‘comets.’ But they were clearly not comets from the descriptions. People were reporting bright flying objects and said the aerial objects were spraying gas, which they called ‘mists’ that caused the Black Death.”

- William Bramley, Atty., The Gods of Eden

The classic sign of the 14th Century bubonic plague was the appearance of buboes shown in illustration, which are swollen lymph nodes in the groin, the neck and armpits that oozed pus and bled. Most victims died within four to seven days after infection. Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible in 1411.
The classic sign of the 14th Century bubonic plague was the appearance of buboes shown in illustration, which are swollen lymph nodes in the groin, the neck and armpits that oozed pus and bled. Most victims died within four to seven days after infection. Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible in 1411.

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August 22, 2008  Modesto, California - Every once in awhile, there is a book that grabs the mind as revelation. In my life, one such book is The Gods of Eden by William Bramley, first published in 1989. William Bramley was then 36-years-old, an older student in law school at Santa Clara University in California. Between high school graduation and law school, he had gotten a Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology because he was always fascinated by the political and war dynamics of human societies. But he needed to earn a practical living for his family and worked in hotel management for fifteen years. Finally, in his decision to go to law school, he also started a book about a question that had always troubled him: why does humanity war so much?

 

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