Part 2: Getting Close to the “Big Bang” Inside Large Hadron Collider?

“The discovery of Higgs boson particles would be the discovery
of a new force of Nature and the first one we will have seen in over a century.”

- Joseph Lykken, Ph.D., Fermi Lab Particle Physicist

 

Looking straight down a segment of the 17-mile-long circular  Large Hadron Collider accelerator. Image courtesy CERN LHC.
Looking straight down a segment of the 17-mile-long circular Large Hadron Collider accelerator. Image courtesy CERN LHC.
 This computer-generated image shows the location of the 17-mile-long (27 km)  Large Hadron Collider (LHC) tunnel (in blue) about 300 feet down on the Swiss-France border. The four main experiments (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb) are located in underground caverns  connected to the surface by 50 meter to 150 meter pits. Part of the pre-acceleration  chain is shown in grey. Illustration courtesy CERN LHC.
This computer-generated image shows the location of the 17-mile-long (27 km) Large Hadron Collider (LHC) tunnel (in blue) about 300 feet down on the Swiss-France border. The four main experiments (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb) are located in underground caverns connected to the surface by 50 meter to 150 meter pits. Part of the pre-acceleration chain is shown in grey. Illustration courtesy CERN LHC.

Return to Part 1

September 9, 2008  Batavia, Illinois -

Composition of Universe  ­     .4% glowing matter such as stars.­   3.6% “normal” matter as we know it in planets and stars.­ 22.0% cold, invisible “dark matter” detectable only by its gravitational influence on normal matter.­ 74.0% invisible “dark energy.”

 

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