Corexit and Crude Oil Still in Gulf Year After BP Disaster; Marine Life Dead and Some People Sick

“The (Corexit) dispersant is sticking around. Key dispersant chemicals
underwent negligible or slow rates of biodegradation.”

- Elizabeth Kujawinski, Ph.D., Marine Chemist,
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

“None of eight Corexit products tested are ‘without toxicity,’
and the ecological effect of mixing the dispersants with oil is unknown,
as is the toxicity of the breakdown products of the dispersant.”

- EPA Administrator

“Some medical doctors have been turning patients away from their offices because they don’t want to deal with political fall out of confirming Gulf oil and Corexit illnesses.”

- Rodney Soto, M. D.

 

March 30, 2011  Orange Beach, Alabama, and Santa Rosa Beach, Florida - Microbiologist Samantha Joye, Ph.D., University of Georgia, showed images of oil-suffocated marine creatures at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico 10 miles north of the BP Macondo oil disaster site that she photographed in recent research presented before the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual conference in Washington, D. C., on February 19, 2011.

BP Deepwater Horizon oil rig burning after the April 20, 2010, explosion that killed 11 men working on the platform and injured 17 others. The disastrous crude oil gusher from the broken BP Macondo well a mile down on the sea floor lasted from April 20 until July 15, 2010, when the well was finally capped. Meanwhile, 770,000 gallons of toxic Corexit dispersant had been sprayed on Gulf waters to allegedly reduce the thick oil slick. Image by EPA.
BP Deepwater Horizon oil rig burning after the April 20, 2010, explosion that killed 11 men working on the platform and injured 17 others. The disastrous crude oil gusher from the broken BP Macondo well a mile down on the sea floor lasted from April 20 until July 15, 2010, when the well was finally capped. Meanwhile, 770,000 gallons of toxic Corexit dispersant had been sprayed on Gulf waters to allegedly reduce the thick oil slick. Image by EPA.

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