Trees Are Dying All Over the World – Including 4,000-Year-Old Bristlecones. What Can Revive Them?

“The champions are in harm's way. The whole country should be forested coast to coast with these giant trees, not with the puny, craggly, miserable mess we call our forests. We don't realize what we've lost.”

David Milarch, Founder and Pres., Champion Tree Project

Left: Montana's lodgepole pine forests before the arrival of aggressive mountain pine beetles at higher altitudes as a consequence of global climate change. Image by Bob Marshall, U. S. Forest Service. Right: These ponderosa pine trees in Helena, Montana, around Jim Robbins's home have been destroyed by the same mountain pine beetle. Image © by Jim Robbins.
Left: Montana's lodgepole pine forests before the arrival of aggressive mountain pine beetles at higher altitudes as a consequence of global climate change. Image by Bob Marshall, U. S. Forest Service. Right: These ponderosa pine trees in Helena, Montana, around Jim Robbins's home have been destroyed by the same mountain pine beetle. Image © by Jim Robbins.

May 24, 2012  Helena, Montana - “When Europeans first came to North America, one of the largest primeval forests in the world covered much of the continent. Experts say a squirrel could have traveled from the Atlantic coast to the Mississippi River without touching the ground. But only about 3 percent of America's native old-growth forest remains.”

Subscribe now to read this report.

Existing members, login below:


© 1998 - 2018 by Linda Moulton Howe.
All Rights Reserved.