Part 4:  Mysterious 12,000-Years-Old Gobekli Tepe, Turkey – Interview with Geologist Robert Schoch.

 

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“All the work Gobekli Tepe builders put into carving those pillars,
erecting them, erecting walls between them at a later stage... is in many
ways dwarfed by the amount of time and work and energy
they put into covering them over again.”

- Robert M. Schoch, Ph.D., Geologist, Boston University

 

Earthfiles Reporter and Editor Linda Moulton Howe interviewed Robert M. Schoch, Ph.D., Geologist, Boston University, inside the Gobekli Tepe, Turkey, excavation site on June 13, 2012.  Right is Jennifer Stein running video camera for Linda and Leo Skorpion, videographer, Skorpion Film Production. Image by Gregory Poplawski for Earthfiles.com.
Earthfiles Reporter and Editor Linda Moulton Howe interviewed Robert M. Schoch, Ph.D., Geologist, Boston University, inside the Gobekli Tepe, Turkey, excavation site on June 13, 2012.  Right is Jennifer Stein running video camera for Linda and Leo Skorpion, videographer, Skorpion Film Production. Image by Gregory Poplawski for Earthfiles.com.
Yellow marker at coordinates for Gobekli Tepe:  37.223237° N,  38.922546° E Gobekli Tepe in Turkish means “Potbelly Hill,” an archaeological site about eight miles northeast of Sanliurfa not far from the Syrian border. The region's water comes from the Euphrates, the longest river of Western Asia, that originates upstream from Keban, Elazig Province in eastern Turkey.
Yellow marker at coordinates for Gobekli Tepe:  37.223237° N,  38.922546° E Gobekli Tepe in Turkish means “Potbelly Hill,” an archaeological site about eight miles northeast of Sanliurfa not far from the Syrian border. The region's water comes from the Euphrates, the longest river of Western Asia, that originates upstream from Keban, Elazig Province in eastern Turkey.

Return to Part 1.

June 26, 2012  Gobekli Tepe, Turkey  - After the sun had risen to completely light up Gobekli Tepe, I interviewed geologist Robert M. Schoch, Ph.D., inside the Gobekli Tepe excavation. I asked him if given that Gobekli Tepe's creation and purpose is perhaps the greatest archaeological and historical mystery on the planet today, what does Dr. Schoch speculate happened a thousand years after the elegant, bizarre, strangely eerie pillars, totem, Urfa man and other sculptures were erected in circles over 30 hilltop acres to cause Someone to cover the whole site back over with dirt?

 

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