Part 5:  Mysterious 12,000-Years-Old Gobekli Tepe, Turkey – Another Artificial Covering Over Mount Nemrut

“Mt. Nemrut is clearly an artificial peak on top of the mountain.
It’s piled up with gravel purposefully ... of a certain size,
of a certain shape so ... it’s actually a very sophisticated pile of gravel.”

  - Robert M. Schoch, Ph.D., Geologist, Boston University

 

Mount Nemrut:  37° 58' 54.0012" N, 38° 44' 27.9996" E Mount Nemrut 25 miles north of Kahta, Turkey, and north of Gobekli Tepe, is another artificially covered mountain top above large stone heads of people and animals spanning cultures of Roman, Persian, Hellenistic, and Anatolian history. The artificial mountain top rises 164 feet above the carved statues that appear to have Greek-style facial features, but Persian clothing and hairstyling. Image © 2012 by Linda Moulton Howe.
Mount Nemrut:  37° 58' 54.0012" N, 38° 44' 27.9996" E Mount Nemrut 25 miles north of Kahta, Turkey, and north of Gobekli Tepe, is another artificially covered mountain top above large stone heads of people and animals spanning cultures of Roman, Persian, Hellenistic, and Anatolian history. The artificial mountain top rises 164 feet above the carved statues that appear to have Greek-style facial features, but Persian clothing and hairstyling. Image © 2012 by Linda Moulton Howe.
2,000 years ago these similar-sized stones were piled up artificially for 164 feet on top of Mount Nemrut, Turkey, apparently as a burial tumulus for Antiochus I. Image © 2012 by Linda Moulton Howe.
2,000 years ago these similar-sized stones were piled up artificially for 164 feet on top of Mount Nemrut, Turkey, apparently as a burial tumulus for Antiochus I. Image © 2012 by Linda Moulton Howe.
Mount Nemrut is the red circle on the right near Kahta, Turkey, that is north of the Gobekli Tepe archaeological site (green circle). Istanbul is the larger red circle on the left.
Mount Nemrut is the red circle on the right near Kahta, Turkey, that is north of the Gobekli Tepe archaeological site (green circle). Istanbul is the larger red circle on the left.

June 28, 2012  Mount Nemrut 25 miles north of Kahta, Turkey - On June 11, 2012, we traveled to see the “8th Wonder of the Ancient World,” Mount Nemrut. It's a 7,000-foot-high mountain (2,134 meters) north of Gobekli Tepe and about 25 miles (40 km) north of Kahta, Turkey. Historically, the astounding mountain burial monument disappeared from world consciousness for two thousand years until re-discovered in 1881 by a German engineer named Charles Sester, who was studying Ottoman transport routes. Then it took until 1953 for any professional archaeological research to be done.

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