Gobekli Tepe Pillars Etched On Bone Found At 12,000-Year-Old Site

“Even though the etched bone plaque bears no holes — which indicates
it was not used as a pendant — it could still have functioned as an amulet
or talisman ... imbuing the bone plaque with a mystical quality in order
to connect it with the Gobekli site.”

- Andrew Collins, Gobekli researcher and author, 2015

 

Bone etching of what appears to be Gobekli Tepe T-shaped pillars with a humanoid holding its hands around one of the tall pillars staring outward with large, black eyes, a long triangular face and small mouth. The existence of this "etched bone plaque"  currently on display at the Sanliurfa Museum in southern Turkey near Gobekli Tepe  was introduced by researcher and author Andrew Collins in September 17, 2015, Ancient Origins, and on November 7, 2015, at Queen Mary University in London. The etched bone was first noticed in the museum by Matthew Smith, a British  telecommunications consultant from the Middle East's Qatar,  who was visiting the Gobekli Tepe archaeological site.
Bone etching of what appears to be Gobekli Tepe T-shaped pillars with a humanoid holding its hands around one of the tall pillars staring outward with large, black eyes, a long triangular face and small mouth. The existence of this "etched bone plaque" currently on display at the Sanliurfa Museum in southern Turkey near Gobekli Tepe was introduced by researcher and author Andrew Collins in September 17, 2015, Ancient Origins, and on November 7, 2015, at Queen Mary University in London. The etched bone was first noticed in the museum by Matthew Smith, a British telecommunications consultant from the Middle East's Qatar, who was visiting the Gobekli Tepe archaeological site.

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