Search Ongoing for 9th Planet, So Massive It Tilts Solar System Planets 6 Degrees

“My first guess is that it'll be kind of like Neptune, but I don't know what it's going to look like.”

- Michael Brown, Ph.D., Prof. of Planetary Astronomy, Caltech

Our sun is the yellow sphere. Planet orbits are depicted as gravitationally interacting rings where Orbit 9 depicts the great elliptical path of what the astronomers think is a gaseous 9th planet in the Oort cloud that is 10-20 times the mass of our Earth. Why such a huge planet would have such an elliptical orbit is still unknown. Speculation is that a passing star at the time the solar system formed might have pulled Planet 9 into the strange orbit. Graphic by Michael Brown & Konstantin Batygin 2016.
Our sun is the yellow sphere. Planet orbits are depicted as gravitationally interacting rings where Orbit 9 depicts the great elliptical path of what the astronomers think is a gaseous 9th planet in the Oort cloud that is 10-20 times the mass of our Earth. Why such a huge planet would have such an elliptical orbit is still unknown. Speculation is that a passing star at the time the solar system formed might have pulled Planet 9 into the strange orbit. Graphic by Michael Brown & Konstantin Batygin 2016.
California Inst. of Technology astronomers Mike Brown, Ph.D., and Konstantin Batygin, Ph.D., discovered that thirteen objects in the Kuiper Belt surrounding our solar system were all moving together as if influenced by the gravity of a very large object that is so far not visible. Above illustration of ninth planet with our Sun in the lower right corner by Caltech/R. Hurt.
California Inst. of Technology astronomers Mike Brown, Ph.D., and Konstantin Batygin, Ph.D., discovered that thirteen objects in the Kuiper Belt surrounding our solar system were all moving together as if influenced by the gravity of a very large object that is so far not visible. Above illustration of ninth planet with our Sun in the lower right corner by Caltech/R. Hurt.

January 27, 2017 Pasadena, California One year ago on January 29, 2016, I reported at my news website, Earthfiles.com, and my Coast to Coast AM radio broadcast,  about a newly discovered ninth planet at the edges of our solar system. Michael Brown, Ph.D., Professor of Planetary Astronomy at Caltech in Pasadena,  reported that a huge object ten to twenty times the mass of Earth was moving in a big looping orbit far beyond Pluto in the region between the Kuiper Belt and the Oort Cloud. Prof. Brown simply calls it “Planet 9.” The discovery has been like chasing a ghost. Whatever is out there, its mass is so great that its gravitational field pushes half a dozen other Kuiper Belt objects to cluster together on the opposite side of Planet 9's huge looping orbit.

 

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