First Photo of Einstein’s Spooky Action At A Distance: “Bell Entanglement.”

“The image we’ve managed to capture is an elegant demonstration of a fundamental property of nature, seen for the very first time.”

— Paul-Antoine Moreau, Ph.D., Prof. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland

 

July 15, 2019  Glasgow, Scotland – On May 15, 1935, physicist Albert Einstein and his two postdoctoral research associates Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton University, New Jersey, published a paper in the Physical Review entitled “Can Quantum Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete?” See More Information link below.

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

Sixty-nine years later that question is still argued and the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy stated on May 10, 2004:  “The (EPR) paper features a striking case where two quantum systems interact in such a way as to link both their spatial coordinates in a certain direction and also their linear momenta (in the same direction), even when the systems are widely separated in space. As a result of this “entanglement,” determining either position or momentum for one system would fix (respectively) the position or the momentum of the other.”

Breakthrough:  Physicists Have Now Photographed Photons in Quantum Entanglement

Physicists at the University of Glasgow in Scotland have for the first time shot a pair of photons from a laser, separated them on very different paths and then captured on a special camera what they looked like.

Full-frame images recording the violation of a Bell inequality in four images. (A) The four coincidence counting images are presented, which correspond to images of the phase circle acquired with the four phase filters with different orientations, θ2 = {0° , 45° , 90° , 135°}, necessary to perform the Bell test. Scale bars, 1 mm (in the plane of the object). (B to E) The coincidence counts graphs as a function of the orientation angle θ1 of the phase step along the object are presented. As shown, these results are obtained by unfolding the ROIs represented as red rings and are extracted from the images presented in (A). The blue dots in the graphs are the coincidence counts per angular region within the ROIs, and the red curves correspond to the best fits of the experimental data by a cosine-squared function. (B) to (E) correspond to phase filter orientations θ2 of 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°, respectively. Credit: Science Advances (2019). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2563
(A) The four coincidence counting images are presented, which correspond to images of the phase circle acquired with the four phase filters with different orientations, θ2 = {0° , 45° , 90° , 135°}, necessary to perform the Bell test. Scale bars, 1 mm (in the plane of the object).   (B to E) The coincidence counts graphs as a function of the orientation angle θ1 of the phase step along the object are presented. As shown, these results are obtained by unfolding the ROIs represented as red rings and are extracted from the images presented in (A). The blue dots in the graphs are the coincidence counts per angular region within the ROIs, and the red curves correspond to the best fits of the experimental data by a cosine-squared function. (B) to (E) correspond to phase filter orientations θ2 of 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°, respectively. Credit: Science Advances (2019). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2563
Paul-Antoine Moreau, of the University of Glasgow's School of Physics and Astronomy, said the image was "an elegant demonstration of a fundamental property of nature".
Paul-Antoine Moreau, of the University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy in Glasgow, Scotland, said this first ever human image of entangled photons was “an elegant demonstration of a fundamental property of nature.” Image by Univ. of Glasgow

Also see:

07-28-2017 – First “Teleportation” of Entangled Photons from Earth to Space Satellite


More Information:

Original Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen paper in Physical Review, May 15, 1935, “Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete?”  https://journals.aps.org/pr/pdf/10.1103/PhysRev.47.777

Scientists Unveil the First-Ever Image of Quantum Entanglement, July 13, 2019, Phys.org:  https://phys.org/news/2019-07-scientists-unveil-first-ever-image-quantum.html

“Spooky” — First Image Captured of Quantum Entanglement, July 13, 2019, The Daily Galaxy:  https://dailygalaxy.com/2019/07/spooky-first-image-captured-of-quantum-entanglement/


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