New Bioterrorism Center

© 1999 by Linda Moulton Howe

May 10, 1999  Baltimore, Maryland - Out of the 76 tornadoes that touched down May 3rd to 4th, Joe Schaefer, Director of the U. S. Storm Prediction Center, says many lives were probably saved by the biggest one because everyone in the weather service could see it coming. That was the F5 vortex that levelled whole subdivisions in Okahoma City. F5s are considered to be one of the most powerful storms on earth and this one was a mile wide and ten miles high ­ so huge that storm trackers could give warnings for more than two hours. Unlike typical tornadoes that break up after moving only a few miles, this F5 traveled 55 miles in a steady path at about 25 miles an hour before breaking up. At one point, police stopped traffic along Route 44 to allow the tornado to pass as it headed toward Oklahoma City. And storm shelters were filling up before the monstrous tornado struck.

 

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Two Antarctic Ice Shelves Almost Gone

© 1999 by Linda Moulton Howe

May 5, 1999  Boulder, Colorado - Tonight, more tornado weather is threatening Moore and Norman, Oklahoma. And so far this week, those vicious half mile wide tornadoes with winds approaching 300 miles an hour in Kansas and Oklahoma this week have killed at least 44 people and wiped out more than two thousand homes and businesses. Earlier this year in January, another series of unusually violent tornadoes tore through the Tennessee region. Are these freak storms? Or will atmospheric turbulence get worse and worse as global warming continues to take hold of the earth?

 

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Mysterious Deaths of Harbor Porpoises on East Coast

Common porpoise (Phocoena phocoena). Photo by Stephen Spotte, Mystic Marinelife Aquarium.
Common porpoise (Phocoena phocoena). Photo by Stephen Spotte, Mystic Marinelife Aquarium.

May 5, 1999 Solomons Island, Maryland - Between March and April 1999, more than 160 porpoises washed up dead or dying along the East Coast of the United States. The number of deaths tripled over 1998. Marine scientists are baffled about why the porpoises are dying in such numbers and plan to have
a meeting in early June 1999 to compare research findings. I talked with Dr. Stephen J. Jordan, Director of the Sarbanes Cooperative Oxford Research Laboratory in Solomons Island, Maryland. His lab cooperates with the federal National Ocean Service and Dr. Jordan summarized what researchers know so far about the porpoise deaths.

 

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Rings In Canadian Forests; Contrail Spheres; and Symbols

© 1999 by Linda Moulton Howe
March 21, 1999-

1) International Air Pollution:

This weekend I'm in Pensacola, Florida for the Project Awareness Conference about unusual phenomena and new millennial trends. One subject many of us will be talking about is global environmental deterioration. And the March 15th, 1999 Geophysical Research Letters, has published the first study to confirm that the air people are breathing in Washington State probably contains chemical pollution from Chinese factories. Professor Dan Jaffe at the University of Washington and his colleagues concluded that 22% of the carbon monoxide arriving at Cheeka Peak in Washington had originated in East Asia. The polluted air took about six days to travel from Asia to North America. Professor Jaffe was philosophical about the fact that our planet seems to get smaller as problems spill from country to country: "We make pollution, too. Everybody's pollution goes somewhere else."

 

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Silver Sphere In Contrails Over Albuquerque, New Mexico

© 1999 by Linda Moulton Howe
 
March 17, 1999 -

At the end of February 1999 when I was in Sedona, Arizona to speak at a conference, several of us went outside to go to lunch. But we were stopped cold by what was in the sky -- a large silver airplane at high altitude was making a perfect and very large white X in a very blue sky. The X stretched from the western horizon up to and past the zenith. A huge X. Then we realized there were other large Xs in the sky. And within a couple of hours, the sky was totally overcast. A couple of days later in Phoenix, I saw similar Xs in a blue sky that later became overcast.

 

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Chickadee Beak Deformities in Alaska

© 1999 by Linda Moulton Howe
 
February 28, 1999 - This week, Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt spoke before a federal Taskforce on Amphibian Decline and Deformities, now referred to as TADD. Babbitt said the entire Cabinet is concerned about "an increasing environmental threat showing up in unexplained declines, deformities and even disappearances of frogs, toads and salamanders -- species that have been on Earth for 350 million years."

 

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Sulfur Bacteria in Whiskeytown, California and Grackles in Louisiana

February 7, 1999 -

Tonight I have some answers to recent environmental mysteries, including the strange white substance found in water near Whiskeytown, California and and the die off of birds in Louisiana. But first, there is unsettling news this week from New England about a rare virus attacking salmon there. When the first boats from Europe arrived at American shores, there were millions of wild salmon in rivers from Maine to Connecticut. But now there are only a couple of thousand left. That is why this recent outbreak of "swim bladder sarcoma virus"- seen only twice before in salmon - is especially tragic. All the virus-infected fish came from Maine's Pleasant River. Biologists have quarantined hatcheries there and have had to kill hundreds of diseased salmon. Some scientists speculate that the virus has spread from commercial salmon farms along Maine's coast where every year thousands of fish escape from their crowded holding pens. Just as humans crowded together can spread disease more easily, those commercial fish carry diseases to wild salmon that have no immunity. Another disease has been destroying birds on the West Coast. One of the worst outbreaks of Avian cholera in memory has killed more than 50,000 water birds in Northern and Central California -- including the rare and beautiful Aleutian Canada Geese that are already on the federal threatened species list. Fortunately, bird cholera is not typically transmitted to humans or other mammals. Scientists speculate that last month's cold weather caused birds to flock together in tight spaces of open water which may have spread the disease - just like the salmon crowded in those Maine commercial fisheries.

 

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Trends in 1999 with Gerald Celente

© 1999 by Linda Moulton Howe
 
January 3, 1999  Rhinebeck,
New York ­ - One year ago, Gerald Celente ­ Editor of The Trends Journal in New York ­ predicted accurately in his New Year's Eve forecast that financial collapse in Southeast Asia would cause great turmoil in United States and global markets. He also warned that new viruses and bacteria could cause pandemics like the 1918 swine flu. Soon after that interview, millions of chickens in Hong Kong had to be killed to prevent a new and lethal virus spreading among poultry. Then Southeast Asia and Russia defaulted on loans and the stock market plunged downward.

So, I asked Gerald Celente recently about trends in 1999:

 

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Nuclear Sabotage in Maryland; Bull Mutilation in Colorado; and Global Warming

© 1999 by Linda Moulton Howe
 
January 24, 1999 -

Nuclear Sabotage

1) First, The Washington Post reported this week that five different times in December and January a woman drove through the main gate of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant just outside Washington, D. C without getting caught. Not only was she not stopped by security, but she set fires. One burned about a quarter-acre. Now, 39-year-old Rosemary Kohl is being held at the Calvert County Detention Center under a $100,000 bond and has been charged with five counts of malicious fire-setting and two counts of trespassing.

 

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