Chandra Telescope Helps Solve X-Ray Mystery

"Since it was first observed thirty-seven years ago, understanding the source of the X-ray background has been the Holy Grail of X-ray astronomy. Now, it is within reach."

- Dr. Alan Bunner, Director
NASA's Structure and Evolution of the Universe

X-Ray Image: A view of our galaxy from the all-sky image by the German-led ROSAT x-ray observatory research "oriented so that the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy runs horizontally through the center. Both x-ray brightness and relative energy are represented with red, green and blue colors from lowest energy to highest. Over large areas of the sky a general diffuse background of x-rays dominates." Provided by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama.
X-Ray Image: A view of our galaxy from the all-sky image by the German-led ROSAT x-ray observatory research "oriented so that the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy runs horizontally through the center. Both x-ray brightness and relative energy are represented with red, green and blue colors from lowest energy to highest. Over large areas of the sky a general diffuse background of x-rays dominates." Provided by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama.


January 17, 2000  Huntsville, Alabama - NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory was launched only five months ago, but it continues to astonish astronomers with its discoveries. One of the most perplexing cosmic mysteries has been the source of x-ray radiation that seems to pervade the universe.

 

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