A Dinosaur with A Warm-Blooded Heart

The fossilized chest cavity of a plant-eating Thescelosaurus dinosaur that died 66 million years ago. The circular, dark object at the center is the dinosaur's heart now confirmed to be four chambered with one aorta like warm-blooded animals today, not the cold-blooded reptilian metabolism assumed for dinosaurs over the past 150 years. Photograph © 2000 by Paul Fisher, NCSU College of Veterinary Medicine Biomedical Imaging Resource Facility, Raleigh, North Carolina.
The fossilized chest cavity of a plant-eating Thescelosaurus dinosaur that died 66 million years ago. The circular, dark object at the center is the dinosaur's heart now confirmed to be four chambered with one aorta like warm-blooded animals today, not the cold-blooded reptilian metabolism assumed for dinosaurs over the past 150 years. Photograph © 2000 by Paul Fisher, NCSU College of Veterinary Medicine Biomedical Imaging Resource Facility, Raleigh, North Carolina.

April 30, 2000 Raleigh, North Carolina - There was an astonishing discovery in the Hell's Creek sandstone of northwestern South Dakota back in 1993: a 13 foot long dinosaur with a heart in its rib cage. It's all fossilized, of course, but now modern CT scanning technology has confirmed it's four chambered with one aorta like warm-blooded animals today, not the cold-blooded reptilian metabolism assumed for dinosaurs over the past 150 years.

 

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