Argentina Animal Mutilation Count Rising Above 100; Federal SENASA and INTA Investigations Have Begun

Specialists from Argentina's federal INTA agency  (similar to USDA's Food Safety Inspection Service) are inspecting  a mutilated cow in the La Pampa province in late June 2002. More than 100 mutilated cows, and now horses, have been reported to local authorities in seven provinces since April. Image © 2002 by Rio Negro Online, Argentina.
Specialists from Argentina's federal INTA agency (similar to USDA's Food Safety Inspection Service) are inspecting a mutilated cow in the La Pampa province in late June 2002. More than 100 mutilated cows, and now horses, have been reported to local authorities in seven provinces since April.
Image © 2002 by Rio Negro Online, Argentina.

June 22, 2002  Buenos Aires, Argentina - This week, the unusual animal deaths known as mutilations ­ which have been making headlines in Argentina's La Pampa Province since early spring ­ finally made the news on American television. The number of cases has continued to rise daily and is approaching 100, according to local newspapers in La Pampa. Horses were also found mutilated this week and the number of affected provinces has increased to seven ­ La Pampa, Buenos Aires, Rio Negro, Santa Fe, Entre Rios, Chaco and Patagonia.

 Map in which yellow indicates towns in provinces of La Pampa, Buenos Aires  and Rio Negro where mutilations have been reported to date. Not shown on the map are other affected provinces further north: Entre Rios, Santa Fe and Chaco.  Reported mutilation count since April 2002 is approaching 100.
Map in which yellow indicates towns in provinces of La Pampa, Buenos Aires and Rio Negro where mutilations have been reported to date. Not shown on the map are other affected provinces further north: Entre Rios, Santa Fe and Chaco. Reported mutilation count since April 2002 is approaching 100.

Specialists from Argentina's federal agencies, SENASA and INTA, are inspecting mutilated cows and having tissue sent to laboratories, including the University of Buenos Aires School of Pathology. SENASA is similar to the U. S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. INTA is similar to USDA's Food Safety Inspection Service.

 

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