Could Cheops Pyramid’s Small Channels and “Doors” Be Resonators or Antennae?

The Great Pyramid of Cheops built 4,500 years ago for King Khu-fu in the 4th Dynasty, near Cairo, Egypt. The three pyramids on the Giza plateau seen from across the Nile. Cheops appears  smaller than Kephren with the white Tura limestone cap because Kephren is on higher  ground. The third smaller to the left are Mykerinos and the two other smallest were for the wife and daughter of King Khu-fu. Drawing © 1971 Peter Tompkins.
The Great Pyramid of Cheops built 4,500 years ago for King Khu-fu in the 4th Dynasty, near Cairo, Egypt. The three pyramids on the Giza plateau seen from across the Nile. Cheops appears smaller than Kephren with the white Tura limestone cap because Kephren is on higher ground. The third smaller to the left are Mykerinos and the two other smallest were for the wife and daughter of King Khu-fu. Drawing © 1971 Peter Tompkins.
"Doors" 1 and 2 are in the southern shaft rising from the Queen's Chamber on the left  of the above diagram. The most recently discovered "Door 3" is on the northern shaft rising from  the same chamber. Both Door 1 and Door 3 have copper pins, staples or handles. Door 1 and Door 3  also block the two respective shafts at approximately the same distance from the Queen's Chamber: 210 feet. Door 2 is seven inches beyond Door 1. The actual path to Door 3 is now known to have three turns in it to get past the Grand Gallery. No one yet knows what is behind Door 2 and Door 3 or what the  purpose of these strange, narrow shafts and little blocks might truly be.
"Doors" 1 and 2 are in the southern shaft rising from the Queen's Chamber on the left of the above diagram. The most recently discovered "Door 3" is on the northern shaft rising from the same chamber. Both Door 1 and Door 3 have copper pins, staples or handles. Door 1 and Door 3 also block the two respective shafts at approximately the same distance from the Queen's Chamber: 210 feet. Door 2 is seven inches beyond Door 1. The actual path to Door 3 is now known to have three turns in it to get past the Grand Gallery. No one yet knows what is behind Door 2 and Door 3 or what the purpose of these strange, narrow shafts and little blocks might truly be.

October 12, 2002  Athens, New York - In 1957, a brilliant analysis of Egyptian architecture was published by philosopher Schwaller de Lubicz in a 3-volume book entitled, The Temple of Man, after his fifteen years of painstaking measurement work at Luxor and other Egyptian sacred sites. The miraculous pyramid and temple structures were, for de Lubicz, the end result of evolved consciousness applying the universe's rules of sacred geometry and Law of One in which "as above, so below" provided an architectural blueprint for the soul/spirit's evolution toward immortality.

 

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