Part 4 – Geologists Run X-Ray Diffractometer on Corguinho, Brazil Stones

“You have presented us with objects that are well outside the things we have encountered before, outside our experience.”

- Art Johnson, Ph.D., Prof. of Geology, Univ. of Pennsylvania

 

Left: The two halves of Stone 2 split by analytical chemist, Phyllis Budinger, for infrared study and EDS plots. Right: Stone 1 in profile to show disk-shape. Stone 1 is 16mm in diameter and weighs 3.2051 grams. Stone 2 before being broken in two was also 16mm in diameter and weighed 3.3068 grams. Both Stone 1 and Stone 2 were collected by Brazilian businessman, Felipe Branco, on September 15, 2002, after a “rain of rocks” on the Urandir Oliveira farm in Corguinho, Brazil. Photograph © 2003 by Linda Moulton Howe.
Left: The two halves of Stone 2 split by analytical chemist, Phyllis Budinger, for infrared study and EDS plots. Right: Stone 1 in profile to show disk-shape. Stone 1 is 16mm in diameter and weighs 3.2051 grams. Stone 2 before being broken in two was also 16mm in diameter and weighed 3.3068 grams. Both Stone 1 and Stone 2 were collected by Brazilian businessman, Felipe Branco, on September 15, 2002, after a “rain of rocks” on the Urandir Oliveira farm in Corguinho, Brazil. Photograph © 2003 by Linda Moulton Howe.
Melted rock sample from shallow crater on Corguinho,  Brazil, hilltop discovered in October 2000, by local residents  who saw a light come down out of the sky toward the hill  and rise up again. Photograph © 2003 by Linda Moulton Howe.
Melted rock sample from shallow crater on Corguinho, Brazil, hilltop discovered in October 2000, by local residents who saw a light come down out of the sky toward the hill and rise up again. Photograph © 2003 by Linda Moulton Howe.

June 6, 2003  Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - Biophysicists W. C. Levengood's observations about the titanium and magnetic quality of the Corguinho, Brazil stones were reinforced by the x-ray diffractometry (XRD) work done May 22-23 at the University of Pennsylvania. Prof. Johnson, whose field is soil analysis, had selected nine objects from my rock trays and collection bags. I also gave him two halves of Stone 2 that Phyllis Budinger had split open. During the first XRD run, he was joined by Prof. Gomaa Omar, an eminent rock expert, and another geologist who specializes in rare earth isotopes. First up was one half of Stone 2, which they called the “button” on the XRD analysis shown below.

Second was a piece of the melted rock that local Corguinho eyewitnesses found in October 2000 after a light came down to the top of a hill and took off again. That rock was arbitrarily labeled “lightening strike” because Dr. Omar said very high temperature had to have been involved.

 

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