Part 1: Martian Water Vapor and Methane Overlap in Equatorial Regions

"A symbiosis of methanogenic bacteria with methanothrophic bacteria in the Martian underground can be an alternative interpretation (to geothermal) and looks more likely."

- Vittorio Formisano, Ph.D.

New in-depth analysis of PFS data by European Space Agency confirms that methane is not uniform in the Martian atmosphere, but concentrated in some areas. The PFS team observed that the areas of highest concentration of methane overlap with the areas where NASA identified water vapor and underground water ice are also concentrated. This spatial correlation between water vapor and methane seems to point to a common underground source. Spectra of red-colored atmospheric CH4 methane and other gases, and W water vapor, from European Space Agency (ESA)
New in-depth analysis of PFS data by European Space Agency confirms that methane is not uniform in the Martian atmosphere, but concentrated in some areas. The PFS team observed that the areas of highest concentration of methane overlap with the areas where NASA identified water vapor and underground water ice are also concentrated. This spatial correlation between water vapor and methane seems to point to a common underground source. Spectra of red-colored atmospheric CH4 methane and other gases, and W water vapor, from European Space Agency (ESA).


September 20, 2004  Ischia Island, Italy - Today at the International Mars Conference held September 19-23, by the Italian Space Agency, physicist Vittorio Formisano, Ph.D., presented results from his analysis of the Martian atmosphere in a paper entitled, "Observation of Methane, Formaldehyde and HS (hydrogen sulfide): Extant Life On Mars?" Dr. Formisano designed the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) for placement on the European Space Agency's Mars Express Orbiter. Back on May 6, 2004, when I interviewed him for Earthfiles and radio, he said his PFS data indicated molecules of formaldehyde in the Martian atmosphere and told me, "Formaldehyde is destroyed in the Martian atmosphere within 7.5 hours. There is no way that formaldehyde can exist and remain for a long time in the Martian atmosphere. If (formaldehyde) confirmed, possibly life on Mars today, yes."

 

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