MARSIS Radar Looking Below Surface of Mars

"It is very interesting that the signal penetrated quite easily through about  2 kilometers (1.2 miles) of material in the crater and that suggests to us that material is probably ice-rich."

- Jeffrey Plaut, Ph.D., JPL

MARSIS, Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding, has been looking below the Martian surface since June 2005 for water ice and/or liquid water. Composite image by European Space Agency.
MARSIS, Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding, has been looking below the Martian surface since June 2005 for water ice and/or liquid water. Composite image by European Space Agency.

December 16, 2005  Pasadena, California - Far from Earth is a mystery that scientists are trying to solve from an orbiting spacecraft that is now looking below the surface of Mars with deep ground-penetrating radar. It's called "MARSIS," which stands for Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding.

 

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