Environmental Emergency Updates: Part 1 – Spreading Honey Bee Disappearances

"Nosema ceranae certainly is a stressor, but it  doesn’t seem to be the smoking gun that we were looking for."

- Jerry Hayes, Apiary Chief, Florida Dept. of Agriculture

Left: Single-cell protozoan by Science Source. Right: Honey bees atop hive board. Another protozoan, Nosema ceranae, has recently been linked to honey bee die-offs in Spain, France, other European countries and the United States. But Colony Collapse Disorder scientists say it's not the final answer to CCD. Honey bee image © 2007 by Matt Cardy/Getty.
Above: Single-cell protozoan by Science Source. Below: Honey bees atop hive board. Another protozoan, Nosema ceranae, has recently been linked to honey bee die-offs in Spain, France, other European countries and the United States. But Colony Collapse Disorder scientists say it's not the final answer to CCD. Honey bee image © 2007 by Matt Cardy/Getty.

May 4, 2007  Gainesville, Florida - In the last week of April 2007, media headlined that University of California-San Francisco biochemists had “tracked down suspect in honey bee disappearances.”

 

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