Earlier, Faster and Deeper Arctic Ice Melt Down

“As longtime Arctic residents, they told me they had never seen
open water so early before - which was late May 2007.”

- Scott Lamoureux, Ph.D., Queen's University

Red circle marks Melville Island between Alaska and Greenland near the Arctic Circle, the site of ice melt studies between 2002 and 2005 by Queen's University geography team.
Red circle marks Melville Island between Alaska and Greenland near the Arctic Circle, the site of ice melt studies between 2002 and 2005 by Queen's University geography team.
 August 2007, Arctic Ocean, open water and ice seen from an icebreaker research vessel. Image by Andy Armstrong, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
August 2007, Arctic Ocean, open water and ice seen from an icebreaker research vessel. Image by Andy Armstrong, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

October 5 , 2007  Kingston, Ontario , Canada - The United Nations International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has had to revise upward its estimates of possible temperature increases over this century. Now, the numbers say that in another 90 years, Earth could be as much as 11 degrees F. warmer than it was at the beginning of the 21st Century. Compare 11 degrees F. to only a 1 degree F. increase in the entire 20th century!

 

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