ICBM Heavy, Concrete Silo Covers Moved Aside by Glowing Discs

“My father told me about the alarms they had (at Minuteman sites) because a missile silo had been breached, that the concrete covers that sit on top of the missiles were set off to one side, and the radioactive material in the warhead was dead.”

- Martin Cole, son of Boeing Minuteman engineer Alden Stockwell Cole

Boeing Bomarc and later Minuteman engineer Alden Stockwell Cole's Prime Secret W33-038 6th Army Area security clearance through Headquarters, Air Material Command, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio, in 1950s to 1960s.
Boeing Bomarc and later Minuteman engineer Alden Stockwell Cole's Prime Secret W33-038 6th Army Area security clearance through Headquarters, Air Material Command, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio, in 1950s to 1960s.

November 23, 2010 Whitefish, Montana   - When the United States decided to build Minuteman intercontinental ballistic missiles and place them in underground silos around Malmstrom AFB in Montana, Warren AFB in Wyoming and Minot AFB in North Dakota, one of the unsung heroes behind the scenes was a Boeing engineer named Alden Stockwell Cole. Alden Cole was born on March 10, 1922, in Portland, Oregon, and died on January 26, 1989, in Eugene, Oregon, at age 67. After high school graduation, Alden Cole began working for Boeing Aircraft Manufacturing Co. in Seattle, Washington, as a sheet metal worker in 1941.

 

Click here to subscribe and get instant access to read this report.

Click here to check your existing subscription status.

Existing members, login below:


© 1998 - 2018 by Linda Moulton Howe.
All Rights Reserved.