Part 2: What Force On Dwarf Planet Ceres Could Push Up A 4-Mile Shiny, Grooved Mountain?

Editor's Note: This Part 2 is about the Ceres 4-mile-high mountain from September 1, 2015, interview with Prof. Christopher Russell, UCLA, Principal Investigator of the Dawn Mission to Ceres. But as of this date, September 4, 2015, no new images or official NASA/JPL information have been released about the latest and lower 915 mile mapping orbit — except one August 19, 2015, aerial image (below report) of the mysterious 4-mile-high shiny, grooved mountain in the Ceres Southern Hemisphere

Since the NASA Dawn spacecraft entered its new, lower mapping orbit of 915 miles above the dwarf planet's surface, an embargo by the journal Nature is preventing the release of new images taken at the new lower 915 mile orbit above the Occator crater and its mysterious, persistent “bright spots.”

This July 2015 image was taken from 2,700 miles altitude in which the vertical relief was exaggerated by a factor of 5 generated by NASA to better highlight topography and subtle features. These intriguing Ceres bright spots are in a crater named Occator, which is about 60 miles (90 km) across and 2 miles (4 km) deep. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/LPI.
This July 2015 image was taken from 2,700 miles altitude in which the vertical relief was exaggerated by a factor of 5 generated by NASA to better highlight topography and subtle features. These intriguing Ceres bright spots are in a crater named Occator, which is about 60 miles (90 km) across and 2 miles (4 km) deep. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/LPI.

Return to Part 1.

September 4, 2015 - Los Angeles, California- Part 2 continues the interview with Dawn Mission's Principal Investigator Christopher Russell, Ph.D., Professor of Geophysics and Space Physics, University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), about the unique and singular 4-mile-high shiny, grooved mountain in the Ceres Southern Hemisphere that is an estimated 250 miles (400 km) from the Occator crater with the mysterious bright spots in the Northern Hemisphere.

NASA's Dawn spacecraft spotted this tall, conical mountain on Ceres from a distance of 915 miles (1,470 kilometers). The mountain, located in the southern hemisphere, stands 4 miles (6 kilometers) high. Its perimeter is sharply defined, with almost no accumulated debris at the base of the brightly streaked slope. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA
NASA's Dawn spacecraft spotted this tall, conical mountain on Ceres from a distance of 915 miles (1,470 kilometers). The mountain, located in the southern hemisphere, stands 4 miles (6 kilometers) high. Its perimeter is sharply defined, with almost no accumulated debris at the base of the brightly streaked slope. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

 

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