Severe Arctic Ozone Loss and Deep Ocean Warming

 

Aurora borealis glows in the atmosphere above the Arctic. The winter of 1999 to 2000, NASA and a European Commission measured the largest ozone depletion, a 60% loss, at 11 miles above the North Polar region. That was greater deterioration in the Arctic than observed during the previous ten years. Image of Arctic region courtesy of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
Aurora borealis glows in the atmosphere above the Arctic. The winter of 1999 to 2000, NASA and a European Commission measured the largest ozone depletion, a 60% loss, at 11 miles above the North Polar region. That was greater deterioration in the Arctic than observed during the previous ten years. Image of Arctic region courtesy of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).


April 20, 2000 Greenbelt, Maryland - This winter, NASA and a European Commission sent two NASA research aircraft up to 70,000 feet above northern Sweden to measure gasses in the upper atmosphere. The specific concern was ozone levels. The stratosphere was much colder than normal this winter which makes ozone deterioration worse. And even though satellites and ground instruments monitor the atmosphere, there hadn't been direct measurement by instruments on a high flying plane since 1992. The result? More than 60 percent of the Arctic ozone at 11 miles above the North Polar region had been depleted.

 

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