Did NASA/JPL Fudge Xenon-129 Data for Both Mars and Venus?

Mariner 10 was launched on November 3, 1973, to fly by our solar system's planets Mercury and Venus to return the first-ever close-up images of those planets. The primary scientific objectives of the mission were to measure Mercury's and Venus's environment, atmosphere, surface, and body characteristics. Image by NASA.
Mariner 10 was launched on November 3, 1973, to fly by our solar system's planets Mercury and Venus to return the first-ever close-up images of those planets. The primary scientific objectives of the mission were to measure Mercury's and Venus's environment, atmosphere, surface, and body characteristics. Image by NASA.

December 22, 2017  Madison, Wisconsin - In 2015, a newly published book by plasma physicist John Brandenburg, Ph.D., was entitled, “Death On Mars: The Discovery of A Planetary Nuclear Massacre.” Sixty-five-year-old John Brandenburg received his Ph.D. in Theoretical Plasma Physics at the University of California-Davis extension campus at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, in 1981. His Ph.D. thesis was about magnetic confinement of plasmas for controlled nuclear fusion. For his book, he analyzed United States 1976 Viking spacecraft data about the Martian atmosphere.

 

Click here to subscribe and get instant access to read this report.

Click here to check your existing subscription status.

Existing members, login below:


© 1998 - 2018 by Linda Moulton Howe.
All Rights Reserved.